Posts- August intercultural reflections

1 Aug

Week 1 Mon/We/Frid  FOCUS: 

You could use the questions below as a broad guideline.

1. WHAT you think is the meaning of Intercultural Communication Competence? Is it just one thing that defines it? Or more? What have you noticed about what you do in the classroom?
2. HOW do you use it in class?

Background:  Elementary 2 class I teach three times a week with range of nationalities: Chinese, Tongan, Lebanese, Chilean, Indian, Pakastani, Sri Lankan, Iranian?.

My take on intercultural commmunicative competence at this level is the ability to describe the differences/similarities between a custom or tradition.  They can not write much at this level so it is all oral activity.  I am particularly interested in drawing out their views so I try to provide a safe environment to discuss anything eg this week:  Ramadan, taking off shoes before you enter a house, the monthly custom of ‘pinch and a punch’ on the first of the month, the notion of ‘eve’ being the evening before a special day, Ramadan fasting and the similarity to Lent for Christians and Easter.  What is your nationality?

The latter was interesting and I drew on the experience of my English parents who never quite felt like true New Zealanders for many years – even when I was a teenager and they had been here for more than 20 years and become citizens they still referred to themselves as English.  I said it was OK to call yourself a Chinese New Zealander for example if you had PR. This seemed to satisfy them.

I have not had a lot of spare time this week so this has all been teacher led with short answers from the students.  Once I have established a strong bond between all the students and myself, the class has settled down and the numbers are stable, I introduce group activities related to cultural exchange.  I am hoping to make them reflect and consider future actions when I do this too.

Week 1 Pre Int class Tues Thurs:

Nationalities: Chinese, Burmese, Thai, Saudi, Afghani, Iranian

I have been using the pictures in the textbook to elicit cultural differences and they are able to say whether something is acceptable or not eg cutting nails in the office cf the bathroom or outside but any cultural comparison is still teacher led at this stage.  There has not been any in depth discussion on fundemental beliefs underpinning the answers yet and the class number is still very unstable with students joining.  This is very disruptive to the dynamics and does not set up a particularly trusting environment.  Once the class has stabilised I hope to set up a more intercultural group discovery sessions.

 

Week 2 focus:

Please refer to the questions below as you prepare the reflection:

1. is communication only verbal?
2.what do you think are some other factors? can you relate a class scenario from a past experience? how did you react? have you made a conscious effort to change the outcome in other classes since then?

Is communciation only verbal?  NO Over 90% is body language.  The emphasis is on speaking in class but in every situation I remind them that in western culture eye contact is important and that they are to use the READ, COVER (the text if it is a controlled practice dialog memorizing activity prior to free activity) SPEAK eye to eye.  This is not the only part of body language I raise their awareness of;  before speaking assessment we have a whole lesson devoted to body language related to good communication.  I find BL fascinating and always include it in every lesson where textbook images lend themselves to interpretation or if it  is necessary for ‘visual reading’ eg folded arms when arguing=can’t change my mind.  GOOD OUTCOMES ALWAYS.  Students are just as interested in finding out about cultural differences.

Other factors in communication include context, the need to speak at all, the environment, the physical ability of the student to respond in a freely physical way – blind/physically or socially challenged, cultural norms eg averting eyes does not always mean ‘shifty’ but can mean respect for authority in some cultures.

Everything has again been teacher led with simple yes no answers or talk in pairs in one class.  In the other class for the first time I started with a teacher led discussion and followed up with small multicultural groups to discuss what would they do in the future. 

The situation surrounded second hand things and their ideas about buying them or not.  I introduced the concept that in NZ it is quite acceptable and there was no stigma attached.  I asked why if it was in their culture and small groups had to think about what they would do if their children came home with second hand things or clothes!! Not enough time to feedback on this one.

 

Week 3 focus:

Is it only cultural background that shapes students’ attitudes,  knowledge and skill? Do these influence classroom behaviors, study habits, writing styles, lecturer -student interactions, etc.?
Hi Yvonne,

What do you do when there is silence/ non-participation in class? 

Have you faced a conflict situation? What were the situations? How did you react?

 

When there is silence or non-participation in classhomesickness, family/financial problems and guide them to the counsellor if the behaviour continues for more than a few days. 

Laughter is always a pretty good antidote to silence so I try to make the activities lighter to facilitate engagement and usually within a short time the situation is resolved.  It is rarely because of cultural norm from my experience. 

I pair the quieter one with a student lacking the strengths they have as another solution so that they are working with their strengths.  Maybe it is a lack of confidence in speaking not engagement in the task.  If the student just needs time to digest information before engaging, then I allow them the time but also point to autonomous learning sources on MOODLE.

Conflict situation 1:  Chinese older man trying to take over the class – being called professor, students deferring to him, constantly bossing women around in Chinese and losing his patience with them when they appear to be slower on the uptake or his explanations aren’t as clear as perhaps he thinks. The student he is ‘coaching’ is the quiet one.

Reaction: FRUSTRATED and not as in control of my skills as I usually am.  (If it gets any worse I am taking him to the Chinese counsellor.)

 

Current Solutions: 

I asked him if he speaks in his own culture when the teacher is talking, (several times on one side) and in front of the class eventually. 

I spoke to him alone several times with no change so I directed difficult questions at him and corrected him if he was wrong. (This was an extreme solution and caused him loss of face but there was no change in his behaviour and it called for a more radical approach.) I praised him if he was correct!

More recently I have had to intervene in a classroom activity where he was teaching in Chinese to a young Chinese man and asked him how many teachers there were in the class. I told him it was OK to teach them OUTSIDE of class time.

I pair him with a gregarious South American to make him concentrate on his English every day.  This has worked best but  if she is away, I pair him with a confident Indian male speaker.  He resents it and quickly moves back to his Chinese ‘enclave’ but I am insistent.

 

Other solutions for silence:

Use mime, VAK activities and get them out of their seats (and comfort zones) as often as possible, direct easy questions to them so that they succeed.

Week 4 focus:

1. What were your initial assumptions about the different cultures in your classroom? What would you say was your initial Intercultural Communication competence? What caused you to form these assumptions?
2. Have you changed your perspective? What reasons led to this? How have you changed?

1.  Initial assumptions which proved correct:

Asians do not question but tend to prefer passively taking in materials.  Asian men will question before the women and if the teacher is a woman they will challenge her. 

South Americans, Indian/Sri Lankan/Pakistani and middle Eastern nationalities tend to be more gregarious in their learning style but literacy skills will vary with education in their homeland or education at Unitec for more than a year.

African/refugee students from ‘Horn Of Africa’ vary in their literacy abilities but are generally communicative.

My IC competence is based on a lot of reading and experience with many different cultures over 26 years of teaching. I start each class with a ‘fresh slate’ but nearly always the assumptions are proved correct throughout the course.  There are only occasional exemptions due to extroverted individuals or personalities not typical of the nationality/ on the extremes of a ‘cline’.

2. My initial IC competence 26 years ago was based on ignorance, inexperience communicating with other nationalities except for Maori and Fijian Indian in Auckland, based on prejudices and stereotypes.  I had never lived in a foreign country before that time, only visited.

Living in a foreign culture forces you to analyse your prejudices and stereotypes. Being on the receiving end of prejudices in Japan was a shock and enabled me to see a different perspective.  It  confronted my biases and assumptions.

I put myself ‘in the shoes’ of the person I am communicating with to try and see their point of view.  I make a lot more allowances for personality within a cultural ‘cline’ after meeting quite atypical Japanese when I lived there.  I constantly read about culture,  try and learn from other nationalities to widen my perspective on culture.

 

WEEK 6  Focus group

8 of us who took part in Indra’s research took part in an hour long session where we discussed points that Indra raised eg humour, our competence etc

FEEDBACK FROM INDRA  19 Sep 2012

Hello Yvonne,

It was really good of you to help me out today by sharing your thoughts and ideas. Very interesting and you should get a star stfor being culturally competent!. I’ll send you a copy of the transcript to reassure you that you’ll remain anonymous.

Take care,
Indra

 

 

 

 

 

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Moodle 2.0 changes and PD sessions July 12 and 18

2 Jul

This was added to the  blog section of Moodle 2.0 for discussion with Unitec campus wide colleagues.

I am giving a short presentation on this for our next PD sessions .  My BIGGEST concern is that with multiple campuses, part timers and teachers spread over several courses we will lose the continuity we previously had.

If anyone can upload then there is no checking of pedagogical outcomes, aims of the activity, links all working etc and those with less skills are bound to make mistakes and delete by accident. There is no problem if there is one teacher per course or a couple withing easy reach of each other.

 

My solution is to have one person per team actively responsible for checking uploads but this is onerous and outside of job description – PIDIT points seems to be the only reward!

 

Love to hear any others’ solutions.  I don’t think I am being anal but a lot of work has gone into standardising our department’s approach and I would hate to see it all lost and a less than professional look the result.

 

At the sessions I will ask DoLS teachers to look for solutions, show how to use JINGs (screen  casts) for vocabulary exploitation and demonstrate PoodLL – the latest app for audio feedback and replacing Nanogong.

Moodle 2.0 changes and PD sessions July 12 and 18

2 Jul

This was added to the  blog section of Moodle 2.0 for discussion with Unitec campus wide colleagues.

I am giving a short presentation on this for our next PD sessions .  My BIGGEST concern is that with multiple campuses, part timers and teachers spread over several courses we will lose the continuity we previously had.

If anyone can upload then there is no checking of pedagogical outcomes, aims of the activity, links all working etc and those with less skills are bound to make mistakes and delete by accident. There is no problem if there is one teacher per course or a couple withing easy reach of each other.

 

My solution is to have one person per team actively responsible for checking uploads but this is onerous and outside of job description – PIDIT points seems to be the only reward!

 

Love to hear any others’ solutions.  I don’t think I am being anal but a lot of work has gone into standardising our department’s approach and I would hate to see it all lost and a less than professional look the result.

 

At the sessions I will ask DoLS teachers to look for solutions and show how to use JINGs (screen  casts) for vocabulary exploitation.

Calico 2012 on Learner support

21 Feb

REJECTED BY CALICO  however useful for a presentation at /ILA WgtCLESOL!

 

Accepted by CLESOL for 2012 conference 4-7 October

 

 

This paper will consider student autonomy on-line and current research, needs of students in our Department, how we addressed the need for support, the development of student identity and results so far.

 

Background

Unitec Institute of Technology is a tertiary institution in Auckland, New Zealand.  The Department of Language Studies in the Faculty of Social and Health Sciences is spread over 3 campuses, includes just over 1100 language students studying in three main programmes:(Certificate of English {CE} & Certificate of Intensive English {CIE} and an advanced programme that is split into a variety of courses from degree to employment.

 

Two years ago Unitec embraced a new all encompassing strategy:  The Living Curriculum. This essentially:

·       involves complex conversations

·       is curiosity or inquiry led and stimulating

·       is practice-focused

·       is socially constructed

·       blends face-to-face and web based learning

·       is research informed

·       has a discipline base

·       develops literacies for life long learning

·       includes embedded assessment.

Digital literacy was an important component. All departments were expected to transfer from Blackboard to moodle within two years.  Only the advanced courses were enrolled in semester 2 of 2010, CIE followed in semester 1 of 2011 and in the last semester CE came on board.

 

How we addressed self-regulation and student identity

Independent Learning is one of the assumed academic skills that students come to a tertiary institution with (Wilson, 2012). Enabling students to succeed, especially in their first semester, is critical to their success.  At Unitec we have found creating Student Zones on moodle developed capability, purpose, resourcefulness, connectedness, helped create the student identity (Lizzio, 2006) and fitted in with the ‘Living Curriculum’ dictates.

 

On moodle all the students are enrolled in the Department of Language Studies Student zone (DoLS SZ), their own course and students from two programmes CE & CIE also have a slightly easier to navigate Student Zone (CE&CIE SZ).  The second zone was set up at the request of CE teachers because the students’ literacy skills are not as advanced and demographics are slightly different.  Both zones contain IT and language support in an index at the top of each page but the zones differ in other ways:

1.     DoLS SZ has a total of 12 links in the index, 6 of which are information about the department: About us, Staff, events, partner institutions, short courses, summer school, and four others; links, feedback, success stories and a face book page.  Students click on the part they need.      

Dols_szone
Dols_sz_it_support

 

 Most of the support is in the form of WebPages with written instructions and screen casts to show how to do something and a few are direct links.

2.     CE&CIE SZ only has a total of 7 links in the index in addition to Language Learning Sites and IT Skills and Support: Programme Events, Student Stories and Local Events and Help.  The zone was only created in July 2011 because the CE programme did not go live until then and teachers demanded simplified student support more in line with their needs.

 

Cecie_szone_index

Cecie_it_support

 

 All of the support is in the form of web pages with embedded screen casts or links and students can close the page without leaving moodle.  This is very important, as the logging in process is time consuming.

Results

Using the report function of moodle we can track participation, students access and see which links are being used.  So far students are engaging when teachers model and illustrate the zones (peaks) so we feel this is a good model for other institutions using moodle.

Cie_ss_first_4_weeks_

 

Cie_ss_first_4_weeks_

 

References:

Lizzio,  A.  (2006)  Griffith University: First Year Experience Project 1.  Designing

 an Orientation and Transition Strategy for Commencing Students.  Retrieved

 22 Feb 2012 from www.fyhe.com au/past_papers10/content/pdf/12D.pdf

Wilson, K.  (2012) Keynote lecture. Lecture presented at Kickstart conference at

 Unitec Institute of Technology. [Powerpoint]

 

 ———————————————————————————————————————————

 NOTES TO HELP CREATE THE ABOVE DOC

Current bdgd

Research review

Needs of ss/context

How addressed

Results so far

Please send inquiries and suggestions for contributions to both Chun Lai (laichun@hku.hk) and Bruce Morrison (ecbruce@inet.polyu.edu.hk). Please list CALICO Journal Special Issue in the subject line.

 

Publication timeline:

·       Feb 25th, 2012: submission deadline for abstracts
(approx. 500 words outlining the purposes and content of the paper)

Purpose is to show how screencasts support

Student zones promote, Language,IT and cultural support – help ss fit in to tertiary envrion

 

 

 

Manuscripts articles should 

  • follow the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed. (2009); 
  • be double-spaced and no more than 8000 words in length (excluding bibliography, tables, notes, abstract, and bio statement). 

 

Place all graphic elements (e.g., screen shots, illustrations, graphics, etc.) and tables at their appropriate locations directly in the manuscript. 

The manuscript submission must also include (in the relevant boxes of the submission form and not in the manuscript)

  • an abstract of no more than 200 words,
  • a list of up to five salient keywords describing the content of the article,
  • a bio statement of the author(s) not to exceed 120 words per author,
  • the contact information of the author(s): name, affiliation, country, and email address.

 

 

Current context

Unitec Department of Language Studies has 3 schools within it:

 

 

Independent Learning  is one of the assumed academic skills that students come to an institution with identified by Professor Keithia Wilson from Griffith University in her study of first year students assessment practice (2009). Enabling students to succeed, especially in their first semester at a tertiary institution is critical to their success.  Student transition to success means engaging the ‘five senses’ (Lizzio, 2006) and at Unitec we have found creating Student Zones on our moodle embodied all of these elements (senses) ie it developed capability, purpose, resourcefulness, connectedness and  helped create /raise awareness??

 

 

approx. 500 words outlining the purposes and content of the paper

ABSTRACT

 

This paper will consider student autonomy online and current thinking around this, needs of students in our Department, how we addressed the need for literacy support, the development of student identity and results so far.

 

Background

Unitec New Zealand is a tertiary institution in Auckland.  Within this, the Department of Language Studies is spread over 3 campuses, includes just over 1100 language students studying in three main programmes:(Certificate of English {CE} & Certificate of Intensive English {CIE} and an advanced programme that is split into a variety of courses from degree to employment.

 

Two years ago Unitec embraced a new all encompassing strategy:  The Living Curriculum. This essentially:

·       involves complex conversations

·       is curiosity or inquiry led and stimulating

·       is practice-focussed

·       is socially constructed

·       blends face-to-face and web based learning

·       is research informed

·       has a discipline base

·       develops literacies for life long learning

·       includes embedded assessment.

Digital literacy was an important component. All departments were expected to transfer from Blackboard to moodle within two years and e-coordinators were set up for each department to facilitate the change and support teachers in the transition.  Only the advanced courses were enrolled in moodle in semester 2 of 2010, CIE followed in semester 1 of 2011 and in the last semester CE came on board.

 

How we addressed self regulation and student identity

Independent Learning is one of the assumed academic skills that students come to a tertiary institution with (Wilson, 2009). Enabling students to succeed, especially in their first semester is critical to their success and retention.  At Unitec we have found creating Student Zones on our moodle developed capability, purpose, resourcefulness, connectedness, helped create the student identity (Lizzio, 2006) and fitted in with the ‘Living Curriculum’ dictates.

 

On moodle all the students are enrolled in the Department of Language Studies Student zone (DoLS SZ), their own course and students from two programmes CE & CIE have had a slightly easier to navigate Student Zone (CE&CIE SZ)since it was implemented  8 weeks into semester 2 2011.  The second zone was set up at the request of CE teachers because the students’ literacy skills are not as advanced and demographics are slightly different.  Both zones contain IT and language support in an index at the top of each page but the zones differ in other ways:

1.     DoLS SZ has a total of 12 links in the index, 6 of which are information about the department: About us, Staff, events, partner institutions, short courses, summer school, and four others; links, feedback, success stories and a facebook page.


2.     CE&CIE SZ only has a total of 7 links in the index in addition to Language Learning Sites and IT Skills and Support: Programme Events, Student Stories and Local Events and Help.   

 

 Results

Using the report function of moodle we can track students access and which links are being used.  So far students are engaging.  Which activities/links will be discussed in more detail with screenshots.

 

Conclusion

We feel this is a good model for other institutions.  (620)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Although the students were all enrolled, it was not discovered until very late that CE teachers were not. This negatively affected the number of students accessing all aspects of the zone as teachers were not scaffolding in class before CALL lab time.  Surprisingly, the number of students accessing this zone was not as badly affected as first thought and the student ‘grapevine’ was obviously responsible for this. 

 

The zone was only created in July 2011 because the CE programme did not go live until then and teachers demanded simplified student support more in line with their needs. 

 

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{page:Section1;} –> and e-coordinators were set up for each department to facilitate the change and support teachers in the transition. 

 

 

 

 

information about  courses available, staff, and events

 

 

 

Student transition to success means engaging the ‘five senses’ (Lizzio, 2006) and

PD elearning session for Department of Language Studies

15 Feb

This was held on Friday 10th Feb 2012

Staff were shown by me:

1. Student Zones and in particular the Language Support and IT Support which I revamped to make more user friendly.  A number of staff commented they would use the IT support themselves. 

From moodle statistics I have seen that students are going to the zones but are not sure what to do once they arrive.  By illustrating the index and explaining to staff that early in the course they should show students the wealth of resources for independent study, I am hoping the numbers visiting language support will rise considerably.  I would like to do a small piece of research illustrating the importance of scaffolding students with IT resources and useful websites directly related to their language learning.

2. How to create a box in their moodle course to replace the sandpit as any activites created here can only be embedded by a circuitous route, does not take into account that the courses are across several campuses.  By closing the eye so students cannot see it, a secure practice area is created.  It is also an area which allows all teachers to analyse, tweek and decide which part of the course is best for a particular activity, before they move it up into the best box. Teachers felt a lot more comfortable experimenting there and by the end of the day  a group of 3 Certificate of Intensive English teachers were using it to create a questionnaire.

3. DoLS NING network and the ICT resources box on the front page.  Many had forgotten their passwords so they were also shown bookmarks or favourites as a way of remembering.  In the ICT resources I had placed links to Russell Stannards teaching resources site so they could learn how to use JING.  I did not have time to demonstrate how to download.

In the last two weeks I have helped 4 colleagues download JING onto their desk top computers and all had problems with upgrading FLASH on PCs.  The one colleague who had a Mac laptop had no problems.  The remaining colleagues all needed help from IT but luckily I have had considerable dialog with them in the past about this site.

4.  Although I wanted to demonstrate www.Eyejot.com, AIlsa Deverick showed her example and got teachers to brainstorm possible uses. I have also helped colleagues with the set up process of this website and the FLASH upgrade has also interfered in the same way.  I have a link to Russell Stannard’s latest video support so I will add this to the ICT support zone on our NING CoP.

5. I used my Posterous portfolio to show the possiblity of using it for e-portfolios for students and PD for teachers.

PD session for CE and CIE Feb 9th 2012

9 Feb

What did I learn?

How is it going to inform my practice?

 

PD NOTES 9 Feb THURS 2012 

NB
Friday Oct 12 last Fri of semester break PD

CLESOL $530 and airfare and accommodation

Attending but not presenting go to Faculty for $

FEEDBACK ON CONFERENCES:

David Smith:

Androgogy:  leader of adults vs pedagogy leader of children

This is a new word for me but I have so much trouble pronouncing it, it is not likely I will be using it to talk about best practice.

Using PREZI.com

Mel

TBLT2011 Teachers’ perceptions of task as a pedagogical concept

Research by Virginia Samuda– tasks: what is , isn’t, aspects of task for LL, 12 typical tasks presented to teachers, tchs discussed their analysis and compared with theory of tasks.

Results: experienced tchs were skeptical of task efficacy

Conclusions: the longer you teach, the more you become skeptical, experienced tchs thought more sequencing and anticipated problems.  Less experienced were not able to anticipate these aspects but were more positive about using tasks.

I have read a lot about task based learning/teaching but it does not surprise me that inexperienced teachers rely heavily on what they perceive as useful communicative activities but that they do not always think about potential problems or aims of the activity.

I have been reminded to think about potental problems again before I start an activity!

Marlene White – same conference on tasks

About androgogy – real world learning for adults

Starting point was needs analysis of students – who, skilled or not, what do they need -civic, participatory etc

Projects: adult immigrants recently arrived in Flanders – Dutch medium primary school , mothers had low level dutch so needed to understand reports, PR, needs analysis incl observations in schools, report/newsletters analysis, interviews with key administrators,

Mums keen to engage

Ran classes in the children’s school, used authentic materials, parents had to organize an event and engage with parents, admin etc   Very hands on.

Community based

Assessments integrated, observations of learners doing tasks, CEFramework linked

 

Use school news letters

Maybe Unitec can contact ESOL teachers inside primary

 

Coaching with bus drivers beside new learners determined tasks for course

Big investment in $

 

Think more about relevancy and real world learners and what kind they are

How are tasks determined?

This was very interesting but much more in line with community education which does not have the assessment criteria or equivalence with NZQA.

I am remindedme of the importance of bringing the world into the classroom and relevant topics in the coursebook which should  replace culturally inappropriate or irrelevant materials.

Joce

Same task conference.  

I can!  (Williams and Burden, 1997)

How to get low level learners to interact

Individual student evaluation, ability checklist and portfolio

Not enough time for tchs to evaluate and even PF difficult

ABILITY CHECKLIST

Topic maps – checklist all uses can related to real world experience

Yes or not ?? How well 1-5 more evaluative?? Raise awareness/process vs achievement – leads to ss goals

EFFORT checklist – students monitor their own attendance and homework

Raise ss awareness?

Signal importance to ss

I use ‘name and shame’ tables of finished work on the wall in my classes and this has been very effective for peers helping each other to catch up and monitor their time management.  At Elementary this is training but I like the ability check list for self evaluation and will probably include it this semester as a trial.

Name and shame self monitored?

DIFFICULTIES

BENEFITS – more autonomy and LL, fewer complaints, enhanced t-s collaboration

Joce’s research showed the greatest movement away from teacher being the main focus of way to learn.

John Hetet

Paper at TBLT on Sunday am Kim McDonagh

Delivery of content online

Research on challenges w. online tasks in Nth Thai

3 areas of challenge:

a) grammar

(ss identified deficit) so used writing more, oral presentations had limited progress

asked audience for sols. & current research in Korea- overall use of tenses esp past, China and her own research in Thailand eg conditionals, wh- questions, and simple past   with first year Uni ss (business) with English part of syllabus

Solutions – post past questionnaires, ss journals and reflect on gr embedded in tasks

b) authentic input – how much is too much?  No. of words in reading

 >209 in a text ie 12 sentences –  is too many

Solutions – More complex readings should be done outside the classroom

Reading programs outside of class – speed, skimming, scanning

c) large classes

challenge as gvt incr. size, policies – prescriptive nature of courses which limit what the teacher can do in the classroom

Solutions >modeling, group and pair interactions, collaborative learning

Chris King ICELF – Joe dela GUsa

Corpora use for Japanese EFL learners – eg of good practice

Ss found their own vocab online and used corpora to see how words were being used, and feedback to class at the end of the semester

CORPORA  – COCA – Corpus of Contempory American English put onto DoLS

Ss zone – free to sign in

Google fight to be embedded for distinguishing similar phrases

This was interesting because I can add to the zones once teachers send me links.

Ailsa –revitalization of Scottish Gaelic – pron garlic!

Joanne McPeak lang policy and

Funding from gvt cf kopapa in NZ

700 children <1% speakers

80% of chilfren come from English sp homes

Gaelic speaking parents choose English med education – benefits of bilingualism, small classes, + start to ed

Teachers are choosing what to teach in the classroom, flipped as not prescriptive

staff may be fluent or just learners – not necessarily bilingual

no training in bilingualism, LL or practise of immersion

RESULTS

Little evidence of 3 year old awareness of bilingualism – replying to answers in English if questions if Gaelic

As child gets older they embedded gaelic words into English sentences

Being child -present orientation

Becoming child -future orientation

Marcus  Stephen May Monolingual Bias in SLA/TESOL

Claim: draws on theorists: monolingualism regulates, replicates beliefs and assumptions to become the central norm.  The nation state becomes reinforced.

If we look at it from a socio-cultural view we will see TESOL more in world view.

Attempts of LL seen in negative way by monolingualists/native speaker:

Eg call it Interference vs fossilization

Boundaries between languages is not that clear and crossover is part of the process

Thoughts:  how can I bring this into the classroom?  Ss expectations of wanting to speak like a native speaker not just communicate.

‘Globish’ – from global communicative and not to be judged.

I find PC can go overboard sometimes but to be not be judgemental about ‘fossilisation of grammar structures’ is dependent on how early you raise awareness of potential problems.

Andrea LED conference – Health literacy in Aotearoa/NZ Challenges and promises for Education  Dr Judy Hunter Uni of Waikato

Study bkgd – Midlands Helath NZ, standards and effects on Education

Phase 1 – realia eg Warfarin pamphlet, aspirin prescription analysis – vocab, grammar and format

Patient resources – language and support from networks, access to GPs esp in rural areas etc

Medical resources – insuff drs, tired drs, more self management of meds., assumptions, pamphlets unreal, data numbers not people, system values wellness

Implications: reading comprehension, learning in supportive communities, understand health care system navigation, ID support, work in colloboration lobby gvt for clear medical language

What can we do?

Grammar conditionals and modals awareness

Real media – labels of meds activities

Vocab work

Youtube

CALL word

Networks of interpreting services, illness foundations etc More refugee illnesses eg ulcers cf NZ high frequency sickness

Unitec free physio and Dr access awareness

Jan Patterson  ATLANZ autonomous

Is a learner advisor and teacher – tension between academic staff and advisors

Mary Silvester and Adele Holland

How to use Poutama tukutuku metaphor – lattice work in stair symbols in woven panels

Team teaching and coteaching linked in.  Potama symbolizes the levels of learning and trying to achieve more.

Kakaho is the grassland plant is what a student  brings to the learning

Kaho is what the institution contributes

Tumatakahuki is the scaffolding which holds everything together made from pingao

Tuhi – front view is the marking

Tuhi from the rear

Tui tui process needs two people

Explicit use of learning goals, student ID what success looks like

Co-tutoring model – subject tutor, students, academic advisor

Team teaching models – up front teaching, tag/tandem teaching or roving trying to maximize teaching

Co-tutoring is a tui tui (threading) process

Comments:

EAP have librarians come in for tui tui

Learning Centre more integration ? with our courses

Unpacking literacy in content courses

Foundation Studies –literacy and sports lecturer co-deliver content

Sue M.  Task BLT  2011

Written vocabulary By Siu-on LEE

Colloquia not always worthwhile more like presentations by inexperienced students.

Policies in Asia favour task based learning

He questions whether students are retaining vocab from text or task content

25% chance of reappearance for each new word in random texts

His emphasis is on writing exercises

How fast can Ss learn new words?  – result student word knowledge is insufficient and words need to be seen 10x

Meaning focused output and fluency activities

Research on furniture vocab:

Pretask: word with pix match  and discussion of furniture in own homes

Eg armoire cruet

Task furniture task – rearrange furniture in apartment in gps

Production report back arrangement

Gp1 : free discussion why put there?

Gp 2: written exercises – did better with reinforcement

RESULTS

All showed drops in memorization if they were tested one week later and did exercises immediately after the task, reading out the words imp.

CONCLUSIONS

IT easy and supportive

Time short then oral ask questions

 Comments:

Test passive or active recall

Anchor new knowledge in a different skill eg learn in reading, anchor it by revision in listening or writing.

Jenni Percy – workshop activity Literacy&Numeracy Uni Waikato

Activity 1 Written by Brett Kelly of the Cranking Widgets Blog

Reading skills – all

Not beginner but Elem up

a)    Choose text & delete words eg signal, alternatives possible, prior task – discuss strategies for guessing unknown words in context, not content specific words

b)   Give out text and work individually on gaps

c)    Discuss alternatives in gp and choose one, justify choice

d)   CF in class on board or OHT

e)    Tch writes the word in the text she or he deleted

f)     Discuss synonyms , meaning of text altered by meaning of word or not

MIGHT provide stimulus to read the rest

g)    Follow up with reconstruction or glossing the text

Activity 2: text features, critical analysis etc esp multi-level class and good for unifying, weak ss participate early  DISAPPEARING TEXT

 

a)    write the text on the board, one with preps, adj and detail

b)   weak learner rubs out 1-3 consecutive words at a time

c)    Rest of the class check to see if text stays the same grammatically but can change the meaning

d)   Can they reconstruct it from one word.

 

I have used this activity before with higher levels but was reminded of a joke I tell with this activity which has always been a lot of fun.  It is only one sentence long though.

OhOh! John!  Please don’t touch there.

Zina R TBLT with Scott Thornbury lecture on ‘dogme’

Seizing the moment. Personal exp are powerful factors to bring into the classroom.  Connections between dogme and task based learning.

Tch role to scaffold this experience.

Syllabus becomes a negotiated activity with students which fits within task based approach.

Anne Feruk – teaching to the task -longitudinal study, how tch embraced unpredictability by using scaffolding and routine, allowing more time for individual/personalised approach.

Can this approach be used more regularly in content based courses? ZR

Can be integrate with new NZQA/unit standard and assessments at Unitec ZR

This last comment by Zina requires me to think carefully about equivalence with the new unit standards but it is unlikely to be used at lower levels.

Jan Dormer EFL context – assessment

4 Characteristics of tasks for assessment:

Formative – aimed at learning and teaching rather than grading and time

Performance based/referenced – of one task

Direct assessment – implies not really testing writing or grammar so level of skill

Ie if you give info gap then you are testing info gap skill

Authentic – the closer to reality the better

Difficulties: socio-administrative

Teachers understanding of what a task is, task based learning, culturally specific?

The most important thing I learned was the 4 characteristics of the task above.  Of these it was an important reminder that direct assessment only tests the task specific skills.


Jill H   IATEFL Scotland UK

Katherine Walter on Grammar Teaching 25-30 parallel sessions over 5 days

Research in entertaining manner then very practical approach.

Lexical approach vs grammar approach

Do we wait for grammar needs to arise?

Two problems with Task based learning TBL

Coverage ( rely on tasks for grammar students’ needs?)and affordage- can teachers think on their feet

Karashen’s Input Hypothesis falsified

Natural Order Hypothesis – small evidence

Vygotsy: evidence for peer scaffolding sparse

 

Explicit gr theories allow for gr tching:

Pres prac Prod PPP   and TBL & Skills approach

Long term + Norris and Ortega 20000

Form focus

CONCLUSIONS

Yes teach  gr explicitly but

Not if backgrd lacking in education, or children

Don’t teach ‘fuzzy rules’

Processing deeply leads to better retention

How to teach inductively:

eg sort into concepts, eg near/far, finished/ happening now,

Match begin and end of rules

Guided questions eg do we use make or do to talk re work/building or creating etc

Highlights of conference:

Michael Swann – using reading more intensively, coursebooks need to be ‘mined’ more to go deeper into the text for critical thinking

Short texts and do more with them

Scott Thornbury’s dogme – need to be careful TTT and student dominating with inexperienced teachers

Paul Nation and Avril Coxhead and Schmidt e-conference

Focused on frequency and gap between 2- 10 000 words.

JJWilson on listening

There was nothing new from Katherine Walter’s talk but I  believe that presentations of grammar can be homework and the the testing of their understanding can incorporate the ‘intuitive’ tasks.  This would give us lots more white space in the course to practically apply the grammar communicatively and relevantly.

I came away yesterday thinking that less is more, white space is important in the classroom, think carefully about potential problems rather than having to deal with them in class, bring more of the outside into the classroom and go outside of the classroom to bring it back to the learning space.

Flipping the ESOL classroom

6 Feb

http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/blogs/nikpeachey/flipping-flipped-classroom

To a certain extent I agree with his ideas: setting grammar or reading for homework is not new in ESOL, especially with the communicative approach focus in class on practice and problem solving.  However, with e-learning becoming an important part of our teaching now, we need to create more white space and there are still far too many teachers presenting Powerpoints of grammar or how to write discursive essays or even vocabulary (often really boring dense text ones with a couple of ‘flash’ add ons: bells and whistles to make it look up to date!)  

These presentations have got to be moved into the homework area. By using screencasts we can even turn them into listening or find better presentations on youtube!  If students don’t keep up, for whatever reason, then you have peer teaching within class, and those conscientious students get extra English practice explaining.  Practice activities become more challenging and revision loops can be embedded into this new white space.  This is something teachers have been complaining about for years: not enough time to revise.

There are plenty of computer labs across campus for accessing moodle or students can access from home.